Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Drones vs. Poachers

Drones vs. Poachers
Rachel Nuwer

Drones have proven their effectiveness as weapons of war. Can they help in the war against wildlife poachers?

Aviation Security Arrangements

Aviation Security Arrangements

http://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/chester/releases/2017/march/dc064_2017.aspx
Providing the public with safe and secure air travel is an Australian Government priority.

Australian Government Media Releases for 23 March 2017

世界の先進事例から考える、日本におけるカーボンプライシングのあり

みずほ情報総研 Vol.614「サービスデザイン」ほか

3月15日

     [レポート]
     世界の先進事例から考える、日本におけるカーボンプライシングのあり
     方
     https://www.mizuho-ir.co.jp/publication/report/2017/mhir13_carbon-pricing_01.html?rt_bn=mm

Scotland's prosperity depends on the Union

Scotland's prosperity depends on the Union

Harriet Maltby, CapX
   The prospect of a second referendum on independence means Scotland's future is yet again uncertain.

Dark day in Westminster

Dark day in Westminster

Alex Massie, CapX
   Today's attack was on somewhere that means and represents something vital about our country. It is the place where we honour our shared agreement that our differences must be settled peacefully.

Brexit and Northern Ireland: former party leaders give evidence

UK Parliament attack - latest updates

BBC news


Challenges to Stabilisation in Iraq after the Mosul Operation

英国会近くで襲撃事件 1人死亡、10人以上負傷

Monday, March 20, 2017

Cyber Security: Deter or Die?

Cyber Security: Deter or Die?
20 March 2017
 
RUSI news

The Occupied Palestinian Territories: recent developments

The Occupied Palestinian Territories: recent developments
Published Monday, March 20, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7689
This House of Commons Library briefing paper looks at recent developments in The Occupied Palestinian Territories (March 2017).

European Energy Security Reimagined

European Energy Security Reimagined
< https://www.swp-berlin.org//en/publication/european-energy-security-reimagined/>

Mapping the Risks, Challenges and Opportunities of Changing Energy
Geographies

SWP news

Food remittances: rural-urban linkages and food security in Africa

   Food remittances: rural-urban linkages and food security in Africa is aimed at researchers and policymakers interested in transforming rural-urban linkages and the implications for food security of rural and urban residents. 

IIED news

The Heritage Insider news

Judges are wrong again in ruling against the Trump travel order. Judges in Hawaii and Maryland have issued injunctions against President Trump’s suspension of travel and refugee settlement from six majority Muslim countries, finding that the order likely violates the First Amendment’s establishment clause by discriminating against Muslims. Among the errors made by the judges: ignoring the law that gives the President the authority to make these determinations, ignoring Supreme Court precedents that affirm the President’s authority in these matters, trying to judge the perceived intent of the order rather than simply reading its plain language, and ignoring the evidence of a real national security threat presented by the revised executive order. And there is this huge error, notes Hans von Spakovsky:
“[Judge] Chuang [of the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland] actually does discuss §1182(f), but he then claims that applying that section against immigrants, as opposed to alien visitors, violates another provision of federal immigration law, 8 U.S.C. §1152(a)(1)(A). This provision prohibits discrimination ‘in the issuance of an immigrant visa because of his race, sex, nationality, place of birth, or place or residence.’
“Chuang dismisses the government’s argument that another provision of that same law—which specifically says that nothing in §1152 (a) ‘shall be construed to limit the authority of the secretary of state to determine the procedures for the processing immigrant of visa applications’—doesn’t apply to Trump’s action.
“Why? Because Trump is not the secretary of state, and this provision ‘expressly applies to the secretary of state.’
“This is a bizarre conclusion. The president does not process visa applications himself. That is the State Department’s job, and the secretary of state is answerable directly to the president.
“A provision of federal law such as this one that gives the secretary of state the authority ‘to determine the procedures’ for alien visas is obviously authority that the president can direct the secretary to exercise.” [dailysignal.com/2017/03/16/what-2-obama-judges-got-wrong-in-striking-down-travel-executive-order]
                                                                     
Hawaii’s hypocrisy: Commenting on his office’s lawsuit against the Trump administration’s travel order, Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin accused the administration of wanting “a system where there are certain ‘races’ that are going to be presumptively in a second-class type of environment, and there will be a ‘superior race’ that is running everything.”
As noted above, there are reasons for rejecting Chin’s claims about the Trump order. But since Chin raises the issue of racial discrimination, it’s worth noting that the state of Hawaii has been pursuing its very own Jim Crow set-up for decades. Today, the state’s Office of Hawaiian Affairs distributes scholarships, loans, grants, and low-interest leases based on racial identity. [www.conservativereview.com/commentary/2017/03/hawaii-sues-trump-admin-for-discrimination-but-have-they-checked-the-mirror]
Even worse, the state’s elected officials have for years supported the creation of a tribal government, elected only by those who can prove they have the right blood in their veins, and which is exempt from portions of the Constitution. [www.heritage.org/report/the-native-hawaiian-bill-unconstitutional-approach-furtherance-terrible-idea]
When the effort to advance that goal in Congress failed, the Obama administration took up the cause by issuing regulations that laid out how tribal status could be established for native Hawaiians. That effort was halted by the Supreme Court in November 2015 because it was clearly unconstitutional. [www.nationalreview.com/bench-memos/427763/supreme-court-halts-hawaiis-discriminatory-election-hans-von-spakovsky]
 
Be part of the solution to rolling back regulation. As we’ve previously noted, the Congressional Review Act, little-used since it passed in 1996, gives Congress with a powerful tool for reining in the regulatory state. The law provides for the revoking of regulations with a simply majority vote in Congress and a presidential signature. Under the CRA Congress has 60 days to vote to disapprove a rule, but that clock starts only once agencies submit rules for review under the procedures specified in the law. For many regulations drafted since 1996, those rules were not followed or ignored altogether. That means the 60-day review period never started, and therefore thousands of regulations are ripe for overturning. The Pacific Legal Foundation has created a website that allows anybody to research and report rules that were never sent to Congress. With your help, the regulatory state can be brought to heel. [www.redtaperollback.com]
 
North Carolina is reducing regulation. In 2013, North Carolina passed a law slating rules for automatic repeal unless they are reviewed and reapproved. So far, the law has had an impact, reports Jon Sanders:
“Already North Carolina is seeing its stock of rules streamline. Its regulatory burden is lightening. About one-eighth of the rules reviewed so far are being removed. Another one-fourth of rules have to undergo further scrutiny through the rule adoption process, meaning it’s possible more are repealed.
“Still, most (61.9 percent) of the rules reviewed so far have been retained. As a result, the chairman of the state Rules Review Commission has urged legislators to make the process stricter to ensure scrutiny of each rule – either the rule is repealed or sent back through the rulemaking process as if newly proposed.” [www.johnlocke.org/research/regulatory-reform-cleaning-up-red-tape-in-north-carolina]
 
When Bharara overreached. Preet Bharara, the U.S. Attorney who was asked to resign/was fired by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, once tried to investigate Reason.com’s commenters because he thought their hyperbolic statements made on the website’s comment page constituted a threat against a sitting judge. In pursuit of that investigation, he also obtained a court order barring Reason from even talking about the matter. [reason.com/blog/2015/06/19/government-stifles-speech]
 
Free people find a way around stupid government rules. The 20,000 lectures that the University of California removed from its YouTube channel in order to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act are not gone forever. A website called LBRY has copied them all and is making them available to the public for free. [lbry.io/news/20000-illegal-college-lectures-rescued]
 
Leonard Leo is the winner of the Becket Fund’s 2017 Canterbury Medal for his work defending religious freedom. Leo will be honored at a dinner on May 4 at the Pierre Hotel in New York City. [www.becketfund.org/canterbury2017]
 
Shame on. The Alliance Defending Freedom has constructed a bracket of shame. It shows which schools among those whose basketball teams made the NCAA tournament are the worst defenders of student free speech on campus. How do you like Bucky Badger now? [adflegal.org/detailspages/blog-details/allianceedge/2017/03/15/the-bracket-of-shame]
 
If it weren’t for their double standards, they’d have no standards at all. The established media is at it again—trying to defend its privileges against journalistic upstarts. This time the Washington Post’s Paul Farhi has written an article wondering why a Daily Signal reporter should be allowed to provide pool reports for the White House Press Corps. Not once in 900 words did he point to any problem with the pool reports produced by the Daily Signal’s Fred Lucas. His issue, rather, is that the Daily Signal is operated by The Heritage Foundation which has “a vested interest in the direction of White House and federal policy.”
Instead of noticing that there are clearly Left-leaning outlets already in the pool rotation (Huffington Post, NPR, and Talking Points Memo), Fahri opines that the “slope could become even more slippery if extremist or racist organizations sought similar status.”
Daily Signal Editor Rob Bluey responds:
“[Fred] Lucas is a great example of a respected journalist who has a well-earned reputation for the quality of his work. The Daily Signal takes editorial independence just as seriously as The Washington Post. Yet because we’re associated with The Heritage Foundation, somehow the standard is different. Heritage Foundation President Jim DeMint has never directed our news coverage at The Daily Signal. I certainly have discussions with him, as happens between editors at The Washington Post and billionaire owner Jeff Bezos. Stop pretending that Bezos is devoid of an agenda. After all, that’s why he purchased the newspaper.” [dailysignal.com/2017/03/12/the-daily-signal-wont-be-bullied-by-the-establishment-media]

BICC news

Schinke, B. et al. (2017). Electricity Planning for Sustainable Development in the MENA Region. (MENA Select Working Paper)
https://www.bicc.de/publications/publicationpage/publication/electricity-planning-for-sustainable-development-in-the-mena-region-686/

Why Scotland needs two more referendums

Why Scotland needs two more referendums

Chris Deerin, CapX
     Given that 62 per cent of Scots voted Remain, Nicola Sturgeon is understandably keen for Brexit to dominate Indyref2.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

OSINT news - ACIPSS Newsletter 4, 2017 - Trump Allows CIA Drone Strikes, Reversing Obama Policy: Report

Trump Allows CIA Drone Strikes, Reversing Obama Policy: Report

pdf ACIPSS Newsletter 04, 17

ACIPSS Newsletter 4, 2017

Trump's bankrupt budget hasn't got a chance

Trump's bankrupt budget hasn't got a chance

Edward Lucas, CapX
   Donald Trump's 'skinny budget' goes to the heart of American politics - the big questions of who gets what.

Trump’s War on the Climate

Trump’s War on the Climate
Basav Sen
The administration is actively denying climate change, but cities and states are fighting back.

IPS news

Scottish independence is now about identity, not money

Scottish independence is now about identity, not money

By Alex Massie
    On the face of it, Nicola Sturgeon goes into a second independence campaign with the odds against her: not only do the economic facts favour remaining in the Union, but most Scots are less than keen on another divisive referendum.
CapX news
 

The Chronicle - Winter 2017

パリ郊外の空港で男射殺、テロか 治安要員を襲撃

47NEWS

パリ郊外の空港で男射殺、テロか 治安要員を襲撃

NHS Winter Pressures 2016/17 - Weekly Update

NHS Winter Pressures 2016/17 - Weekly Update
Published Friday, March 17, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers SN07057
    Weekly update on NHS winter pressures facing acute hospital trusts in England. Includes data for accident and emergency diverts, bed days lost to Norovirus closures, trusts facing operational pressures, and bed occupancy.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Disrupting Human Trafficking: The Role of Financial Institutions

The Role of France in the Prohibition of Nuclear Tests

The Role of France in the Prohibition of Nuclear Tests

GCSP news

Is China eroding the bargaining power of traditional donors in Africa?

Is China eroding the bargaining power of traditional donors in Africa? March 2017, Volume 93, Number 2

https://www.chathamhouse.org/publication/ia/china-eroding-bargaining-power-traditional-donors-africa#sthash.DilfAuRS.dpuf

Chatham House news

Blair era 'mistaken identity' rendition case goes to high court

◦EU taskforce highlights security failings that facilitated terror attacks

国際問題】2017年3月号No.659 焦点:「南シナ海比中仲裁後のアジアの海」

JIIA news

国際問題】2017年3月号No.659 焦点:「南シナ海比中仲裁後のアジアの海」

ブリーフィング・メモ「イスラエルと無人システム」を掲載しました。

Using Air Quotes, White House Walks Back ‘Wiretap’ Talk

Using Air Quotes, White House Walks Back ‘Wiretap’ Talk
 
 
 
Sean Spicer said that President Trump’s unsubstantiated claims weren’t meant to be taken literally. And Kellyanne Conway tried to clarify her ideas on microwaves as spyware.
 
The New York Times news
 

Dutch Vote Tests European Populism

Dutch Vote Tests European Populism



Brexit - implications for private pensions

Brexit - implications for private pensions
Published Wednesday, March 15, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7629
    Looks at the emerging discussion about the potential implications of Brexit for EU pensions

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Whoever wins a second referendum, Scotland loses

Whoever wins a second referendum, Scotland loses

Chris Deerin, CapX
     Nicola Sturgeon hopes to take advantage of the uncertainty surrounding Brexit to deliver her great and only political ambition: Scottish independence.

al-Qaeda remains more influential than Islamic State in Yemen

al-Qaeda remains more influential than Islamic State in Yemen
However, both organizations has grown in influence in Yemen since 2011

DIIS news

Booklet - Good Practices in Mental Health and Wellbeing

Health-EU Newsletter - European Reference Networks

Booklet - Good Practices in Mental Health and Wellbeing
This booklet was produced under the EU Health Programme (2014-2020) in the frame of a service contract with the Executive Agency (CHAFEA) acting under a mandate from the European Commission.

      
http://ec.europa.eu/newsroom/dae/redirection.cfm?item_id=55119&newsletter=261&lang=en

わが国企業における生物規範工学に関する調査・研究・考察

みずほ情報総研 Vol.613「仮想化の落とし穴」ほか

 [レポート]
     わが国企業における生物規範工学に関する調査・研究・考察
     ―アイディアの産婆さん―
     https://www.mizuho-ir.co.jp/publication/report/2017/mhir13_bio_01.html?rt_bn=mm

The Next Ebola?

Can May see off Sturgeon's secessionist schemes?

Can May see off Sturgeon's secessionist schemes?

Robert Colvile, CapX
The 'Auld Alliance' saw France and Scotland team up to torment the English. Nicola Sturgeon's strategy is to do much the same.

European security in its winter of discontent

Car-driven Central-East European economies risk smash

Tigers Show Off European Capabilities in Mali

Burma: country policy and information notes

Burma: country policy and information notes

  • UKVI
  • Guidance

Brexit: What next for UK fisheries?

Brexit: What next for UK fisheries?
Published Tuesday, March 14, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7669
    The implications of Brexit for fisheries are highly uncertain. The implications will depend on future negotiations with the EU and future UK Government policy.

Monday, March 13, 2017

Pop singer Adam Faith 'spied on Fidel Castro for MI6'

Guardian News

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/12/pop-singer-adam-faith-spied-on-fidel-castro-for-mi6

Pop singer Adam Faith 'spied on Fidel Castro for MI6'

When will MPs do their jobs and protect our privacy?

When will MPs do their jobs and protect our privacy?

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/mar/09/mps-protect-safety-wikileaks-surveillance

Guardian News

Kellyanne Conway Explains Microwave Oven Surveillance Comments

Kellyanne Conway Explains Microwave Oven Surveillance Comments
Ms. Conway clarified that she was not, in fact, accusing President Barack Obama of spying on President Trump via a kitchen appliance.

OPEN LETTER TO THE PEOPLE OF GREECE: YOU ARE BEING SLAUGHTERED BEFORE THE WORLD’S EYES

Trump and Merkel Need to Find a Way to Work Together

Netherlands-Turkey Rift Widens Ahead of Vote

ALL BREAKING BEDS OF OUR MOST FAVOURED AGGRESSOR

RESHAPING INTERNATIONAL ORDER:U.S. FOREIGN POLICY UNDER THE DONALD J. TRUMP ADMINISTRATION

Brexit Glossary

Brexit Glossary
Published Monday, March 13, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7840
    This Commons Library research briefing contains a list of commonly-used terms and acronyms that have needed clarification since the United Kingdom voted in the June 2016 EU referendum.
 
Brexit: devolved legislature business
Published Monday, March 13, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7815
This paper is a record of Brexit-related business in the devolved legislatures. It is updated every Monday.
 
Defence and security after Brexit: a reading list
Published Monday, March 13, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7742
The Commons Library has compiled a selection of analysis and comment on defence and security related matters, relevant to the UK's forthcoming withdrawal from the European Union.
 
Brexit: a reading list of post-EU referendum publications by parliament and the devolved assemblies
Published Monday, March 13, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7912
This reading list brings together briefings on Brexit by the parliamentary libraries and the devolved assemblies with reports by parliamentary committees following the result of the EU referendum on 23 June 2016.
 
Brexit reading list: legal and constitutional issues
Published Monday, March 13, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7702
The Commons Library has compiled, from a wide range of sources, a selection of analysis and comment relevant to the UK's forthcoming withdrawal from the European Union.

Saturday, March 11, 2017

New research monitors the integration of immigrants into Irish society

The Economic and Social Research Institute news

New research monitors the integration of immigrants into Irish society

 

America's real drug problem

America's real drug problem

Christopher Caldwell, First Things
    Salisbury, Massachusetts (pop. 8,000), lost one young person in the decade-long Vietnam War. It has lost 15 to heroin in the last two years.

The US perspective on NATO under Trump

Hope 'key to Brexit vote'

IPPR  news

Hope 'key to Brexit vote'

New research from IPPR shows that social mobility - or the lack of it - was key to understanding why areas voted to leave or to remain in the EU referendum.

Post-Brexit trade

Our experts put forward policy priorities for Commonwealth trade ministers, as well as analysis of what the latest Brexit developments mean for the UK and developing countries.
 
ODI news
 

Drug Industry CEOs Are Profiting off Our Opioid Epidemic

IPS news

Drug Industry CEOs Are Profiting off Our Opioid Epidemic
Sarah Anderson
    A labor leader whose son was a victim of the opioid epidemic has inspired a campaign to crack down on these pain profiteers.

The Heritage Insider news

Obamacare 2.0? | It's the third-party payment, stupid! | Weak ACA replacement threatens Maine's Medicaid success. | Travel suspension clarifies national security issues. | Standing up for free speech at Middlebury.

Is “replace” undermining the “repeal” part of the program? Republicans campaigned on repealing ObamaCare, and this week they unveiled a new health care bill in the House. Does it repeal anything?
How about the regulations that have destabilized the individual insurance market (primarily the requirement that insurers cover pre-existing conditions)? Nope.
The individual mandate? Sort-of, but not really. The bill replaces the tax penalties for not having insurance with a weaker insurance-gap penalty that will hit those who try to game the system by signing up only when they get sick.
The Medicaid expansion? Nope.
The exchange entitlements? Those are replaced with refundable tax credits—i.e., a replacement entitlement program.
The “Cadillac tax,”—the 40 percent excise tax on high-cost plans? No. The tax-exclusion on employer-provided health insurance incentivizes the purchase of high-cost plans—and thus encourages the overconsumption of health care generally. Instead of addressing that problem directly with a cap on the exclusion, the GOP bill keeps Obamacare’s Cadillac tax in place.
Read on:
The GOP’s Obamacare Repeal Bill Is Here. Is This Just Obamacare Lite? by Peter Suderman, Reason, March 6;
House Republican Health Care Bill Missed the Mark, by Edmund Haislmaier, The Daily Signal, March 7;
Congressional Republicans’ Obamacare Replacement Won’t Cut It, by Michael Tanner, National Review Online, March 8;
5 Reasons the GOP’s Obamacare Plan Isn’t Real Repeal, Genevieve Wood, The Daily Signal, March 9;
Obamacare v. GOP Replacement Proposal, Texas Public Policy Foundation, March 10.

 
It’s the third-party payment, stupid. Veronique de Rugy explains the underlying problem in health care for the infinitieth time:
“[A]t the heart of the Republicans’ inability to reform health care is their commitment to this notion that the provision of health insurance is the goal rather than the provision of health care or, more fundamentally, the production of health itself. Though insurance companies love it because it guarantees overinflated profits for their industry, this idea goes a long way toward explaining why the supply of health care remains so expensive. […]
“According to a Congressional Budget Office report in July, consumers pay for only 11 percent of their health care costs. Everything else is paid for by third parties, whether it’s the government or private insurance. That’s a problem, because when people’s consumption is paid for by someone else, it jacks up demand and drives up the prices and inefficiencies of the subsidized good or service. Why should you consume health care carefully if you don’t pay for it? And of course, health care providers have little incentive to keep their prices low to retain their customers (patients) because these consumers aren’t paying the full tab.
“[Robert] Graboyes notes that this laser focus on the provision of health insurance coverage has distracted us from a more important health care goal: producing better health for more people at lower cost, year after year. The solution here is innovation. Nothing would affect prices and quality of health care as radically as revolutionary innovation, which we’ve seen in other fields, such as information technology. To encourage such innovation, we have to free the health care supply from the many constraints imposed by federal and state governments (both blue and red) and the special interests they serve.” [Reason]
 
Will Maine’s Medicaid success survive the GOP health care bill? Maine has shown that a state can regain control over its finances by focusing its Medicaid spending on those who truly need help. That lesson could be lost if the House health care bill is passed. Mary Mayhew, commissioner of the Maine Department of Health and Human Services, explains:
“From 2000 to 2010, previous administrations expanded Maine’s Medicaid program, causing it to double both in enrollment and cost. Due to annual shortfalls, the state was unable to pay hospital bills and provider rates were constantly slashed to bail out the Medicaid program.
“The worst of it all, these prior expansions came at the direct expense of our elderly and disabled as nursing facility costs were ignored, home care services were grossly underfunded, and wait lists for home and community services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities grew longer. […]
“As we’ve reduced enrollment by 24 percent, we’ve contained spending to an average 2 percent rate of growth compared to the national average of 6 percent.
“This year, we are forecasting a 0.7 percent increase.
“At the same time, however, we have been able to increase funding to nursing facilities by over 40 percent, increase rates to home care by 60 percent, and add an additional $100 million to support the needs of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
“Additionally, we’ve invested in increased support for primary care to better manage individuals with chronic diseases and to integrate primary care and mental health for those struggling with mental illness.”
The lesson:
“The current House proposal that delays the repeal of the Medicaid expansion will absolutely trigger a push to expand Medicaid in nonexpansion states—Maine included—by the same advocacy groups that have been trying for the last several years.
“Such an effort will bankrupt our state and send us backward from the economic stability we have achieved today.” [The Daily Signal]
 
New executive order on travel clarifies its national security purpose and its scope. On Monday, President Trump signed a revised executive order suspending travel and refugee admissions from certain countries that present a terrorism risk. The new EO applies to travel and refugee admissions from six of the seven countries identified by the EO issued on January 27; Iraq is no longer included in the new order because that government is cooperating with the United States on vetting travelers. The order also provides greater clarity on those who are not subject to the order—including diplomatic personnel, those already granted a visa or refugee status, and dual nationals with a passport issued by any country other than the six identified in the new EO. Hans von Spakovsky writes that while the original EO was perfectly legal, the new one does a better job of laying out the national security case for the suspensions of entry and refugee settlement:
“The six remaining countries had been designated by the Obama administration as ‘countries of concern’ (Libya, Somalia, and Yemen) or state sponsors of terrorism (Iran, Syria, and Sudan). The new executive order lists specific reasons for each country’s inclusion in the suspension taken from the State Department’s Country Reports on Terrorism 2015 (released in June 2016).
“It is certainly common sense (and easy to understand) why one would suspend entry from countries whose governments are official sponsors of terrorism, given that we could not trust any records those governments produce when their citizens are being vetted.
“And the executive order points out that the other three countries were designated as countries of concern by Jeh Johnson, President Barack Obama’s secretary of homeland security, in 2016 based on three statutory factors set out by Congress:  
1. Whether the presence of an alien in the country or area increases the likelihood that the alien is a credible threat to the national security of the United States. 
2. Whether a foreign terrorist organization has a significant presence in the country or area.
3. Whether the country or area is a safe haven for terrorists. […]
      “Finally, the revised executive order also takes the time to answer another question that arose in the litigation over the previously issued executive order. The order specifically states that since 2001, ‘hundreds of persons born abroad have been convicted of terrorism-related crimes in the United States. They have included not just persons who came here legally on visas but also individuals who first entered the country as refugees.’
      “That includes the two Iraqi nationals convicted in 2013 for multiple terrorism-related offenses who were admitted as refuges in 2009. According to the order, Trump has been informed by the attorney general ‘that more than 300 persons who entered the Untied States as refuges are currently the subjects of counterterrorism investigations’ by the FBI.” [The Daily Signal]
       
      The Middlebury College faculty is standing up for free speech. Responding to the actions of some of its students whose protests shut down a planned talk by Charles Murray and injured a professor, a group of Middlebury faculty has put out a statement of principles. These include:
      “Exposure to controversial points of view does not constitute violence.
      “Students have the right to challenge and to protest non-disruptively the views of their professors and guest speakers.
      “A protest that prevents campus speakers from communicating with their audience is a coercive act.
      “No group of professors or students has the right to act as final arbiter of the opinions that students may entertain.
      “No group of professors or students has the right to determine for the entire community that a question is closed for discussion.
      “The purpose of college is not to make faculty or students comfortable in their opinions and prejudices.
      “The purpose of education is not the promotion of any particular political or social agenda.
      “The primary purpose of higher education is the cultivation of the mind, thus allowing for intelligence to do the hard work of assimilating and sorting information and drawing rational conclusions.” [Free Inquiry on Campus]

      South Korea's President Removed

      CFR news

      South Korea's President Removed

      C.I.A. Scrambles to Contain Damage From WikiLeaks Documents

      C.I.A. Scrambles to Contain Damage From WikiLeaks Documents
                    
      The agency halted work on some projects while the F.B.I., suspecting a disaffected insider as the leaker, prepared to interview hundreds of people with access to the information
      .

      「わたしの構想」No.28「オープンガバナンスの時代へ」を掲載しました。

      Brexit and financial services

      Brexit and financial services
      Published Friday, March 10, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7628
          This Commons Library briefing paper brings together responses from financial organisations about the impact of the vote to leave the EU,. The vote to leave the EU has significant implications for the financial services sector, an economic sector which is critical to the UK economy