Sunday, January 22, 2017

Open source intelligence (OSINT) is information that comes from publicly available sources

How to Collect Open Source Intelligence

By: Kim Miller, Ph.D., CFE

Homeland Security Today

African states will monopolise list of least developed

Oxford Analytica news

African states will monopolise list of least developed

     Least developed countries (LDCs) share common traits but also show gradations among development indicators

Foreign fighters could be decades-long global threat

Oxford Analytica news

Foreign fighters could be decades-long global threat

     Returning foreign fighters are often at the heart of jihadi recruitment and terror operations

Legislating for Brexit: Statutory Instruments implementing EU law

Legislating for Brexit: Statutory Instruments implementing EU law
Published Monday, January 16, 2017 
Commons Briefing papers CBP-7867

    How does the UK implement EU law and how many UK laws are there which implement EU law? This paper looks at how the majority of EU directives are implemented in the UK and lists EU-related UK Statutory Instruments.

Brexit: devolved legislature business

Brexit: devolved legislature business
Published Monday, January 16, 2017 
Commons Briefing papers CBP-7815

    This paper is a record of Brexit-related business in the devolved legislatures. It is updated every Monday.

Brexit: how does the Article 50 process work?

Brexit: how does the Article 50 process work?
Published Monday, January 16, 2017 
Commons Briefing papers CBP-7551

    This Commons Library briefing paper looks at the process of withdrawing from the EU under Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union. There could be a complex and difficult negotiation lasting two years or more, or the UK could leave without settling its exit terms or its future relationship with the EU.

Brexit reading list: economic, business and transport policy issues

Brexit reading list: economic, business and transport policy issues
Published Wednesday, January 18, 2017 
Commons Briefing papers CBP-7830

  The Commons Library has compiled, from a wide range of sources, a selection of analysis and comment relevant to the UK's forthcoming withdrawal from the European Union.

Brexit: what impact on those currently exercising free movement rights?

Brexit: what impact on those currently exercising free movement rights?
Published Thursday, January 19, 2017 
 Commons Briefing papers CBP-7871

    This Commons Library briefing paper addresses the question of the status, post-Brexit, of EU citizens currently resident in the UK and those British citizens living elsewhere in the EU.

UK relations with West African countries

UK relations with West African countries
Published Friday, January 20, 2017 
Commons Debate packs CDP-2017-0028

    The House of Commons Library prepares a briefing in hard copy and/or online for most non-legislative debates in the Chamber and Westminster Hall other than half-hour debates. Debate Packs are produced after the announcement of parliamentary business. They are intended to provide a summary or overview of the issue being debated and identify relevant briefings and useful documents, including press and parliamentary material. More detailed briefing can be prepared for Members on request to the Library.

1/11付東洋経済ONLINEに、翁百合理事の「『ブロックチェーン』は世界をこう一変させる」が掲載されました。

1/11付東洋経済ONLINEに、翁百合理事の「『ブロックチェーン』は世界をこう一変させる」が掲載されました。

NIRA news

CREST: 25-Year Program Archive


EARL GREGG SWEM LIBRARY news

CREST: 25-Year Program Archive


    Introduces a revised site for accessing declassified Central Intelligence Agency reports.  From the Central Intelligence Agency

Dynamics of Radicalization and Violent Extremism in Kosovo

Dynamics of Radicalization and Violent Extremism in Kosovo


Looks at the characteristics of parts of Kosovo which have made it a prime recruiting area for fighters in Iraq and Syria.  From the United States Institute of Peace

EARL GREGG SWEM LIBRARY news

Trump Inauguration: Challenges Facing the New Administration, and the World

TRUMP’S TURN

【国際問題】2017年1・2月合併号No.658 焦点:「安全保障と技術の新展開」

Saturday, January 21, 2017

NRIパブリックマネジメントレビュー

Robert Steele: Trump Intelligence — An Interpretation for Europe

Making pulses affordable again: Policy options from the farm to retail in India

女性大行進、大統領に抗議 「反トランプ」世界へ波及

The Heritage Insider: More choice and more due process in education are worthy goals, Pryor is strong on defending political speech, direct primary care is fixing health care financing, Little Pink House comes to the big screen

The Heritage Insider: More choice and more due process in education are worthy goals, Pryor is strong on defending political speech, direct primary care is fixing health care financing, Little Pink House comes to the big screen

This week, Secretary of Education nominee Betsy DeVos was challenged for her views on school choice and due process on campus. But more choice and more due process are worthy goals to pursue. William Pryor, reportedly on the short list for the Supreme Court, has a good record on defending political speech from regulation. Direct primary care is disrupting health insurance for the better, and it’s not a government program. Little Pink House, the tale of Susette Kelo standing up to eminent domain bullies, hits the big screen soon.

DeVos is right: More choice will improve education. School choice came up during the confirmation hearing for Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s nominee to head the Department of Education. Lindsey Burke has some facts on the topic, including: “Greg Forster found that, of all random assignment evaluations conducted to date, 14 out of 18 show that choice improves academic outcomes for students. Moreover, 31 of 33 empirical studies find that school choice improves academic outcomes in public schools. Forster also found that 25 of 28 empirical studies on the fiscal impact of school choice find school choice saves money.” [The Insider]

Who will defend due process on campus? During her confirmation hearing, DeVos was also asked, by Sen. Bob Casey, whether “she supports the radical view that it should be more difficult for campus sexual-assault victims to receive justice.” What’s going on here? Harvey Silverglate, co-founder and board member of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, explains that higher education has all but abandoned the idea of due process for adjudicating sexual transgressions, but those who raise this objection are being smeared as defenders of sexual assault. Silverglate writes:
“The Obama administration and certain nonprofits, including the AAUW, want to make it easier for campus disciplinary tribunals to credit the complaints of alleged victims and to punish the accused, frequently by expulsion.
“The Education Department has instructed universities to adjudicate claims of sexual misconduct using the low ‘preponderance of the evidence’ standard, in which the mere 50.1% likelihood of guilt is sufficient. FIRE argues that a higher standard may be necessary—particularly given that campus judicial systems typically lack many if not most of the procedural protections available to defendants facing criminal charges, or even civil liability, in a court of law.
“Lest anybody doubt the problem caused by the absence of due process, a quick scan of the landscape produces myriad examples. A Brandeis student sued the university after it found him guilty—without a hearing—of sexual misconduct for, among other things, staring at his then-boyfriend’s body while the two shared a bathroom. Judge Dennis Saylor, in a decision allowing the lawsuit to move forward, noted that Brandeis’s ‘inquisitorial’ process ‘appears to have substantially impaired, if not eliminated, an accused student’s right to a fair and impartial process.’” [Wall Street Journal]

Pryor has a good record on defending First Amendment rights against attempts to regulate political speech. Judge William Pryor is reportedly one of the leading candidates to be nominated to the Supreme Court by President Donald Trump. David Keating writes that Pryor has defended political speech rights in two important cases: Scott v. Roberts, which concerned Florida’s scheme to use public funds to subsidize the campaigns of candidates who raised less money than their opponents; and Beaulieu v. City of Alabaster, which concerned a city ordinance that regulated political signs more strictly than commercial signs. [The Insider]

Health care innovation, in spite of ObamaCare: ObamaCare was sold as a way of fixing the insurance market. Maybe instead of doubling down on the insurance system, the way to fix health care is to blow up health insurance as we know it. That’s what Direct Primary Care is doing—cutting out the insurers for routine care and using insurance only for catastrophic care. Think Freely Media has produced a series of videos showing how it works: “How Health Care Should Be.”

Little Pink House hits the big screen. Nearly twelve years ago, the Supreme Court brought an end to a long-running legal battle over the use of eminent domain. The Court ruled that New London, Conn., could use eminent domain to take private property and hand it over to other private parties for a redevelopment project. That decision, however, sparked a movement around the country to check the abuse of eminent domain. To date, 42 states have passed laws placing some sort of restrictions on the use of eminent domain since the decision.
The backlash happened because the Institute for Justice and homeowner Susette Kelo decided to bring the lawsuit that became Kelo v. City of New London. While the plaintiffs fell one Justice short at the Supreme Court, they succeeded in exposing the shabby behavior of New London and Connecticut politicians who hatched the plan to destroy a lower-middle class neighborhood in order to enrich a private company.
Korchula Productions has produced a dramatic film telling the story of their battle against the New London Development Corporation. It’s called Little Pink House and it’s based on a book of the same name by Jeff Benedict. The film stars Catherine Keener as Susette Kelo and Jeanne Tripplehorn as Charlotte Wells, the original head of the New London Development Corporation.
The film will have its debut soon. It is slated to be shown at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival on February 2. Additionally, it is scheduled to be shown February 9 at the Athena Film Festival in New York City.
We got the chance to see the film at the State Policy Network’s Annual Meeting last fall, and we can attest that the film is very well done. We already disliked the Court’s decision, and we disliked it even more after seeing Little Pink House.

Trump told America what it wanted to hear

Trump told America what it wanted to hear

By Tim Montgomerie
   In a three-part series, Tim Montgomerie shares the conclusions he drew after a year spent covering the US election. For one thing, Trump’s victory should not have come as such a surprise. Before his victory, Americans were more pessimistic about their country’s future than ever. And Hillary Clinton’s association with an administration better known for hype than hope meant Trump won in spite of, not because of, his failings. 

CapX news

'China-Africa investment treaties: do they work?'

   China and several sub-Saharan African states have signed bilateral investment treaties. 'China-Africa investment treaties: do they work?' explores the content of the treaties, and whether they achieve their stated goal of promoting foreign investment as part of South-South foreign cooperation. 

IIED news

Refugee Policy in Northern Europe

Refugee Policy in Northern Europe

Nordic Countries Grow Closer but Differences Remain
One year after the great refugee influx reached Europe, lasting changes are seen to have occurred in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. All four have tightened their asylum policies, in some cases drastically, and border controls between them have been reinstated for the first time since the 1950s. While differences over joint EU migration policy also remain, the situation has also created awareness of the need to improve coordination of migration and integration policies in Northern Europe. Closer coordination with Germany would also be desirable.
SWP Comments 2017/C01, January 2017, 4 Pages

Northern Brexit vision

Lords debate key IPPR report

Peers including the Archbishop of York John Sentamu, broadcaster Lord Melvyn Bragg and government spokesman Lord Young this week debated IPPR North's State of the North report.

The debate uncovered widespread support for IPPR North's proposal for a Northern Brexit Negotiating Committee to ensure the North's £300bn economy is fully considered as we leave the EU.

The EU’s Enlargement Strategy - is it working?

The EU’s Enlargement Strategy - is it working? 

   In the December 2016 European Neighbourhood Watch editorial, Associate Senior Research Fellow Erwan Fouéré argues that the European Commission needs a more creative and determined approach to make the enlargement process more meaningful and tangible. To read a PDF of the editorial, please click the button below.

CEPS news

Friday, January 20, 2017

The Heritage Insider: How to improve health care, the model Supreme Court Justice, Kentucky goes right-to-work, RIP Nat Hentoff and Roy Innis, government is the problem with infrastructure

The Heritage Insider: How to improve health care, the model Supreme Court Justice, Kentucky goes right-to-work, RIP Nat Hentoff and Roy Innis, government is the problem with infrastructure

Health care will get better the same way that progress is made in every other area of human endeavor—by letting unplanned innovation happen. The next Supreme Court Justice has big shoes to fill; but at least that person will have the benefit of Antonin Scalia’s model. Kentucky has become the 27th right-to-work state, and has charted a new path for the right-to-work movement in the process. Two icons of the liberty movement were lost this week: Nat Hentoff and Roy Innis. The Trump administration can help infrastructure by getting government out of the way.

How health care will really get better: Both the House of Representatives and the Senate have passed budget resolutions calling for a repeal of ObamaCare. Why did President Obama’s signature domestic program fail to fix American health care? What reforms can do so? Sen. Jim DeMint finds lessons in the history of the automobile industry:
“By the end of the 1970s, Japan, once known for its cheap trinkets and poor product quality, was overtaking the U.S. automobile and manufacturing industries in terms of quality, efficiency, and costs. That was largely due to the business practices revolution led by Edward Deming, an American management consultant who went to Japan after World War II to rebuild its infrastructure.
“Deming’s message was that companies could become successful by prioritizing quality above quotas, and bottom-up observations about efficiency from the factory floor in place of top-down edicts from the boardroom. Japanese corporations listened, improved, and grew.
“In contrast, manufacturers in the U.S.—even during the “golden age” of American assembly-line production—were not keen to listen to their customers’ complaints, nor to their workers’ ideas for improving quality and lowering costs. […]
“Just like the American companies that lost market share when they refused to innovate, establishment politicians have lost elections because they ignored the outrage of Americans over the high costs and low quality of big government services.
“The answer is not to replace one top-down centralized plan with a different top-down centralized plan. Rather, the solution lies in clearing out the web of government regulations and subsidies that shield the status quo from the kind of bottom-up innovation that produces better quality at lower cost.” [The Daily Signal]

What do we want in a Supreme Court Justice? President Trump will soon nominate a candidate to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court. How should we evaluate the nominee? Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, who has himself been nominated for a post in the Trump administration, provided some guidance on that question last June when he gave a speech at Hillsdale College’s Allan P. Kirby, Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship:
One of the chief principles Justice Scalia championed, as a scholar and as a judge, is that the law, whether statutes or the Constitution itself, must be applied according to its text. In other words, judges should not apply the law based on what is good policy or what they suppose Congress may have intended in passing legislation. Justice Scalia rejected the judicial activism of inventing law while embracing judicial engagement by ensuring that the limits on government are strictly enforced.
“Ensuring that the next justice appointed to the Supreme Court is someone in the mold of Justice Scalia is surpassingly important. The appointment of the next Supreme Court justice could be the most legally significant event for our country in a generation. If the next justice is in the mold of Justices Ginsburg or Sotomayor, the rulings of the Court will shift dramatically to the left. If the next justice shares the principles and philosophy of Justice Scalia, the ideologically balanced Court that we have grown accustomed to in the last quarter century will likely remain.” [Hillsdale College]

Right-to-Work comes to Kentucky. Kentucky became the 27th right-to-work state last weekend when Governor Matt Bevin signed a bill making it illegal for employers to require union membership as a condition of employment. Jim Waters of the Bluegrass Institute writes that Kentuckians can look forward to better wages: “Compare what happened in West Virginia, which, like Kentucky, dragged its heels on right-to-work for years until passing it last year, to what happened in Indiana and Michigan. Vincent Vernuccio of the Michigan-based Mackinac Center for Public Policy found: Average wages in both Indiana and Michigan increased after right-to-work laws were passed. Since Indiana became a right-to-work state in 2012, it’s average wage rose faster than West Virginia’s. Between 2012—when Michigan passed its right-to-work law—and mid-2015, incomes in Michigan rose more than 9 percent, which was faster than both West Virginia and the national average. Between 2012 and 2014, average hourly wages rose by 56 cents to $19.94 in Indiana, 56 cents to $21.70 in Michigan but only 37 cents to $18.21 in West Virginia.”[Richmond Register]
But Kentucky’s experience, as Kevin Mooney writes, provides a new roadmap for the right-to-work movement in other states: “What happened in Kentucky is not necessarily going to stay in Kentucky. That’s because the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, which covers districts in Kentucky, Michigan, Tennessee, and Ohio, issued a ruling in November that upheld the right of localities to pass right-to-work ordinances in the absence of state-level legislation. The action began in Warren County, Kentucky, in the fall of 2014 with 11 other counties following suit. The Kentucky counties argued that because the federal government has already authorized states to pass right-to-work laws, it follows that the counties are also permitted to pass right to work since they are creations of the state. Therefore, the counties argued, local right-to-work ordinances are permissible unless a state legislative body explicitly forbids them. Jim Waters, president of the Bluegrass Institute, a libertarian, free-market think tank in Kentucky, said in a phone interview with The Daily Signal that Warren County’s decision to press ahead with its own ordinance certainly had an impact on what happened statewide.” [The Daily Signal]

The liberty movement lost two of its champions last Saturday. Nat Hentoff, a writer who championed free speech, died at 91. Roy Innis, a civil rights activist who staked out conservative positions on crime, welfare, gun rights, and other issues, died at 82.
Of Hentoff, Paul Gallagher writes: “Hentoff didn’t simply pay lip service to the First Amendment. He meant what he said. Consider his book “Free Speech for Me — But Not for Thee.” People who advocate removing “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” from school reading lists because it contains racial slurs could expect no support from Hentoff. Chapter one profiles some on the front lines of the perpetual battle to ban Mark Twain’s novel. The freedom to read means you risk being hurt. But that, in his view, is how you learn to think and to reason. It’s how you make vital connections.” [Dayton Daily News]
To hear Hentoff explain why hate crime laws are contrary to the First Amendment, check out the Cato Institute’s interview with him from 2011.
Innis led the Congress on Racial Equality from 1968 until his death. He also held various leadership positions with the National Rifle Association. Innis, who lost two of his sons to gun violence, once told Newsday: “My sons were not killed by the KKK or David Duke. They were murdered by young, black thugs.”
Ralph Hallow writes of Innis: “His ability to win the respect of people across the political spectrum and from the entertainment and sports world was something to behold. ‘If you’ve never been to one of Roy Innis’ annual CORE dinners in Manhattan on Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, here’s what you missed,’ said [Wayne LaPierre, head of the National Rifle Association]. ‘Three rows of “head tables” filled by cops and politicians from all five boroughs — every sitting mayor, I mean from Ed Koch [to] Rudy Giuliani. You’d see famous singers from the Metropolitan Opera, boxing impresario Don King, former heavyweight champ Evander Holyfield.’ […] At these dinners could be seen Laura Bush, Jane Fonda, Peggy Noonan, Ted Turner, George W. Bush, Howard Cosell, Muhammad Ali, Charlton Heston, Usher, Morgan Freeman and Barry Manilow.” [Washington Times]

An infrastructure program worth supporting: If the Trump administration wants to spur infrastructure, writes Chris Edwards, it can do so by getting the federal government out of the way: “As Obama administration officials head for the door at the Department of the Treasury, they have released a new study on infrastructure. […] The Treasury report suggests that some ‘major challenges to completion’ of projects are imposed by governments.
“One challenge is ‘significantly increased capital costs:’
“Capital costs of transportation and water infrastructure have increased much faster than the general rate of inflation over the past 20 years … Increased capital costs are also a product of enhanced design standards and regulatory requirements related to performance, safety, environmental protection, reliability, and resiliency.
“Another challenge is ‘extended program and project review and permitting processes:’
“Successful completion of the review and permitting processes required by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), which requires federal agencies to assess the environmental effects of their proposed actions, is an important part of project development. NEPA helps promote efforts to prevent or eliminate damage to the environment, but has also extended the schedule and generally increased the cost of implementing major infrastructure projects. This is a long-standing challenge that has spanned the last 20 to 30 years. Studies conducted for the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) concluded that the average time to complete a NEPA study increased from 2.2 years in the 1970s, to 4.4 years in the 1980s, to 5.1 years in the 1995 to 2001 period, to 6.6 years in 2011.” [Cato Institute]

先頭を歩く ― CO2削減2050年目標に思う―

みずほ情報総研 Vol.605「パリ協定を動かすお金の話」ほか

   [コラム]
     先頭を歩く ― CO2削減2050年目標に思う―
     https://www.mizuho-ir.co.jp/publication/column/2017/0110.html?rt_bn=mm 

OSINT news - ACIPSS-Newsletter 01/2017 - Detained Islamic State suspect says Tunisian journalists were executed

01/2017
ACIPSS-Newsletter - Today's intelligence news; tomorrow's intelligence history


Detained Islamic State suspect says Tunisian journalists were executed

 http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/detained-islamic-state-suspect-says-tunisian-journalists-were-executed-1054402019

Why Brexit is the perfect opportunity to drop our aid target

Why Brexit is the perfect opportunity to drop our aid target

Daniel Mahoney, CapX
   For all the criticism, the Department for International Development is one of the most effective Government departments. Nevertheless, Dfid’s pledge to spend 0.7 per cent of the UK’s GNI on foreign aid has seen it throwing money at questionable projects and investing in opaque partnerships. With the UK soon to reclaim its development budget from the EU, the Government has to decide whether sticking to this arbitrary target is the best way to reduce poverty worldwide.

G20 partners to address global agriculture challenges in Germany

G20 partners to address global agriculture challenges in Germany

   Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, Barnaby Joyce, will attend the G20 Agriculture Ministers' meeting in Berlin this week as a part of Australia's push to strengthe...

Australian Government Media Releases for 20 January 2017 

the confluence of Arctic warming and energy demand in Arctic in Context.

Erica Dingman writes about the confluence of Arctic warming and energy demand in Arctic in Context.
World Policy Institute news

The 10 steps to a progressive Brexit

The 10 steps to a progressive Brexit

This week, Theresa May’s long-awaited Brexit speech set the UK on the road to a hard-hitting negotiation with the EU. Read IPPR’s analysis of the 10 key issues that should underpin her strategy.

Brexit plan has nothing for developing countries

Why Trump’s Labor Secretary Pick Might Back Down From the Job

Why Trump’s Labor Secretary Pick Might Back Down From the Job
Sarah Anderson
    As the Office of Government Ethics looks into Andrew Puzder, they'll find he's fought against basic worker productions while enjoying special CEO rewards at CKE.

IPS news

How Trump rewrote the political rules

How Trump rewrote the political rules

Tim Montgomerie, CapX
    In the second of his three-part series, the leading conservative commentator reflects on the extraordinary election campaign, and the extraordinary times ahead. Is America's media still fit for purpose? 

Monday, January 9, 2017

Migration: A Crisis Europe Can’t Keep Out

Migration: A Crisis Europe Can’t Keep Out

 Ústav mezinárodních vztahů, v. v. i.

Russia–China rapprochement and its impact on Asia and Europe

Material Factors for the MENA Region: Data Sources, Trends and Drivers

Material Factors for the MENA Region: Data Sources, Trends and Drivers

Martin Keulertz (coordinator), Mark Mulligan, Eckart Woertz, Emanuela Menichetti and Sven Biscop

CIDOB news

Brazil as a Security Actor in Africa: Reckoning and Challenges Ahead

GIGA Focus Latin America

Climate Change, Migration and Fragility

New US Administration, Same US Submarine Procurement Programme

九州のインバウンド観光需要-九州における訪日外国人旅行者の特性と需要動向

九州のインバウンド観光需要-九州における訪日外国人旅行者の特性と需要動向

    2016年の日本の訪日外国人旅行者数は2,400万人近くに達したと思われる。九州でも観光・宿泊・小売販売における訪日外国人の存在感は高まっている。しかし、全国と比較して国籍では韓国人が多く、クルーズ船を初めとする海...

 NLI Research Institute news

Exchange Rates and International Currency: Perspective from China and Japan(開催報告)

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Continuing Down the Road to Reintegration: Status and Ongoing Support of the U.S. Air Force's Wounded Warriors

Trump could shift US thinking on nuclear weapons

Trump could shift US thinking on nuclear weapons

  Citing international dangers, Trump has called for Washington to boost its nuclear arsenal and reverse past reductions

 Oxford Analytica news

金融ITフォーカス

POST-BREXIT: BRITISH INTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY COOPERATION WITH EUROPEAN UNION STATES INCLUDING GREECE

Foreign Policy Priorities for the Trump Administration

BREXIT - PAKISTANIZATION FINALLY COMES HOME

BREXIT - PAKISTANIZATION FINALLY COMES HOME

02 | 01 | 2017
(Who Needs Greater State Projects in the Balkans?) Dr. Zlatko Hadžidedić

RIEAS news

The Trump World Order

The Trump World Order – Get Ready For A Wild Ride

by Markos Kounalakisvia Sacramento Bee
Thursday, January 5, 2017
Guessing what the world will look like in the Trump era is a risky game.

 The Hoover Daily Report

Saturday, January 7, 2017

Legislating for Brexit: EU external agreements

Legislating for Brexit: EU external agreements
Published Thursday, January 5, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7850
   The EU has over 1,000 external agreements with other countries or organisations, many of which the individual Member States, as well as the EU, have ratified. Many of them concern trade but they cover a range of policy areas and it is not clear what Brexit will mean for the UK's participation in these agreements.

NIRAオピニオンペーパーNo.28「新たな働き方としてのフリーランス―都市と地域の対立を超えて―」を掲載しました。

Brexit reading list: economic, business and transport policy issues

Brexit reading list: economic, business and transport policy issues
Published Thursday, January 5, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers CBP-7830
    The Commons Library has compiled, from a wide range of sources, a selection of analysis and comment relevant to the UK's forthcoming withdrawal from the European Union.

Friday, January 6, 2017

Robots, Brexit and the Anthropocene - welcome to 2020s Britain

Coverage

Robots, Brexit and the Anthropocene - welcome to 2020s Britain
New Statesman, 4 January

IPPR news

Why this one Obamacare provision should stay

Why this one Obamacare provision should stay
Henry J. Aaron, Paul Ginsburg, Linda J. Blumberg, and Stephen Zuckerman 

 Brookings Brief news

Brexit, Agriculture and Agricultural Policy

Centre for Policy Studies news

new CPS report Brexit, Agriculture and Agricultural Policy

A Genocide in Waiting

A Genocide in Waiting
Cassandra Vinograd

   South Sudan’s escalating bloodshed has played out largely along ethnic lines, pitting Dinka against Nuer. An internationally mediated truce fell apart last year, and as grantee Cassandra Vinograd reports, the UN now warns of an impending genocide.

 Pulitzer Center news

Whitehall’s lack of experience is not Brexit’s greatest problem

Whitehall’s lack of experience is not Brexit’s greatest problem

Oliver Illott, CapX
  Sir Ivan Rogers's shock resignation as Britain's ambassador to the EU depletes our already anaemic stock of negotiating experience. But while this is bad, it is no calamity. Any civil servant who has worked on fisheries, customs or migration projects will have spent much of their career thrashing out compromises with European counterparts. The really worrying thing is that, with three months to go, we still don't have a battle plan.

Donald Trump & Our Nuclear Future

"Donald Trump & Our Nuclear Future," from the Cato Institute Tumblr

Thursday, January 5, 2017

The Senate just took a first step toward repealing the Affordable Care Act

The great European unraveling?

After Britain voted to leave the EU, the European dream of a united continent is at risk, but it's not yet dead. The Atlantic Council’s Alina Polyakova argues that EU leaders must create opportunities for young people to reap the benefits of the economic bloc’s accomplishments. Unless a new generation is made a political priority, it could be lost to the far-right parties sweeping across Europe.
 
 World Policy Journal news

How to fight terrorism in the Donald Trump era

How to fight terrorism in the Donald Trump era
Daniel L. Bym

 The Brookings Institution news

DST driving cognitive performance research

DST driving cognitive performance research 

DST Group

http://www.dst.defence.gov.au/news/2017/01/04/dst-driving-cognitive-performance-research
Defence Researcher Eugene Aidman leads a research team at DST supporting the Army in their pursuit of cognitive edge in human performance.

 Australian Government Media Releases for 5 January 2017

Brexit will do the same

Repealing the Corn Laws increased our prosperity. Brexit will do the same

Paul Marshall, CapX
   The triumph of the Anti-Corn-Law League in 1846 resulted in an era of freer trade and unparalleled prosperity. The same could be true for Brexit, given the protectionism that (among other things) sees the eurozone impose tariffs of 30 per cent on agricultural products from Africa. Yet bizarrely, the Liberal Democrats - whose predecessors led that first fight for free trade - have set their face firmly against it.

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Shale gas and fracking

Shale gas and fracking
Published Tuesday, January 3, 2017 | Commons Briefing papers SN06073
   The regulatory regime for fracking in the UK is covered in this note along with comment on environmental concerns. It also covers the new access provisions and debate on fracking in during the Infrastructure Bill’s passage through Parliament.

Monday, January 2, 2017

India-Pakistan Needs Trump Administration’s Focus

December 2016
By
Fred Strasser
     Relations between India and Pakistan are becoming less predictable as nationalist sentiments in India heighten political pressure there to escalate its response to clashes in the disputed territory of Kashmir, specialists on the two states said.

USIP news

The Trump Nail In The Media Coffin

The Trump Nail In The Media Coffin

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Townhall

The Hoover Daily Report news

Energy Reform & Access to Water

Energy Reform & Access to Water

December 13, 2016
    This paper analyzes access to water in Mexico in the context of the country’s energy reform, including social conflicts that ... 

  James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy news

PRIO Gender, Peace and Security Update (Issue 4-2016)

PRIO Gender, Peace and Security Update (Issue 4-2016)

Gender and Inclusion in the Colombian Peace Process

The Use of Force Against the Islamic State